Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence

There is a popular line of thinking about Artificial Intelligence (AI) that says that Machine Learning is the pathway to AI. This idea gained momentum partially because Machine Learning is the hot topic (and buzzword of the decade), but also because we understand ML fairly well. With ML in hand, it is easier to make machines that can learn and become smart, while making machine smart out of the box is a much more difficult task.

This approach makes sense. After all, the only intelligence that we know – human – is learned, not built. In other words, even if we were to invent Asimov-style positronic brains, robots will still need a period of learning after being fully assembled. Of course robots will need to learn a whole lot faster than humans – nobody wants a robot that takes 18 years to become functional. Fortunately, robots can learn much faster than humans. But to learn fast, robots need a lot of input to process. It means that they will have to learn from shared information (as opposed to the personal experiences alone). To give a hypothetical example, a robot would become a good driver much faster if it can learn not just from its own driving history, like all humans do, but from the experience of all the other robot drivers. Robots will need to remain in constant communication with each other (whether centralized or decentralized) in order to keep up with all the changes in the world around them and get better at whatever they’re doing.

Now, how will ML help us achieve AI? By itself, ML is just machine code capable of syntactic manipulation based on certain statistical rules, which is not intelligence of any kind, not even a weak AI. Will it lead a computer system to developing intelligence? The Chinese Room argument says it’s impossible to jump from syntactic rules to semantic understanding, so there is still a big phase transition to be made before AI becomes a reality. Patience, please.

Wer wartet mit Besonnenheit

Der wird belohnt zur rechten Zeit

(Roughly: Whoever waits patiently, will be rewarded at the right time. © Rammstein).

Disclaimer: opinions expressed in this post are strictly my own – not of my employer.

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